Left to My Own Devices

September 6, 2013

Welcome to my blog.  Let me introduce myself.

I am Edward J. Schloss MD, but I’ve been called Jay all my life.  Online, I’m @EJSMD, and I work as a clinical cardiac electrophysiologist at The Christ Hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio.  Although my primary professional focus is direct patient care, I also do a lot of clinical research with The Lindner Research Center here at the hospital.  I take care of a variety of patients with electrical disorders of the heart, but in recent years I’ve focused most of my practice on the care of patients with pacemakers and ICDs (implantable cardioverter defibrillators).  I implant and extract devices as well as provide the follow up care of these patients.  We don’t have fellows or residents in our lab, so I am the operator for all of my procedure.  I am fortunate to be surrounded by a remarkable team of physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, technicians, medical assistants, industry personnel and administrators that keep everything running smoothly.  I am madly in love with my best friend Kendahl, and we’ve been married for over 24 years.  We have three amazing children ages 15, 20 and 21.  I have a bio up on our practice website.

Although this blog is just starting (see my prior two posts), I’ve been actively writing about cardiology and healthcare in online and social arenas for a few years.  I’ve considered starting a blog for a while and jump in now with some degree of trepidation.  Left to My Own Devices will serve as a platform for me to communicate issues primarily affecting my professional world.  As the name implies, expect to hear a lot about pacemakers and ICDs and other issues in cardiology.  I do hope, however, to extend my reach into broader arenas of healthcare in which I have passion, such as healthcare policy and electronic medical records.  I’ve already written a lot on twitter about these issues and done a bunch of long form journalistic pieces on Cardiobrief.org or Forbes.com.  For the blog, I’m hoping to find the sweet spot between 140 characters and 1000 words.

I’d like to recognize a few important people who’ve helped me along the way:

-       J. Rod Gimbel MD single handedly started the Cleveland Clinic Heart Center website from the fellows room back in 1994, just before I started training there with him.  Naturally, all but a few thought he was crazy.  Rod showed everyone that the web is a viable platform to “narrowcast” cardiology content to a specialized audience.  He is still breaking down barriers with his research on MRI of pacemakers and I am proud to be one of his coauthors.

-       Wes Fisher MD is a practicing EP in Evanston, IL and truly is the blogfather of cardiology.  He’s still cranking out regular amazing content at DrWes and on twitter.  Wes hosted my first ever blog comment back in 2008 and has continued to mentor and promote me unfailingly since that time.  He is a bold, entertaining writer who knows just how to skate the line between smartass and wise guide.  He’s the guy shining lights into the blind alleys of health care policy.

-       Larry Husten at Cardiobrief, Forbes.com,  Cardioexchange, and twitter is an first-rate real medical journalist who gave me my first break by posting my summary of the St. Jude Riata Lead Summit back in January 2012.  With that offer, I suddenly felt like a legitimate writer.  With his broad platform and wise editorial guidance, I’ve been able to dramatically expand my reach.  He sets a high bar for excellence, and when I send him content, it still kind of feels like Senior English class back in high school.

-       John Mandrola MD is an electrophysiologist in Louisville, KY who blogs at Dr. John M.  John and I started out as “twitter buddies” and now we’re good friends in real life too.  His humanity permeates all he writes, and if you were sick, this is the kind of guy you’d want as your doctor.  It’s flattering to be supported and promoted by such as great guy and insightful writer.

I finally started the blog this week because I really needed to find a home for the the two posts I just published.  For years I’ve had other ideas bubbling up,  and this forum will allow me to decompress.  Since I don’t really have a roadmap built, it still remains to see exactly where Left to My Own Devices takes me.  I can assure you, though, that what you read will be honest and filled with passion.

EJS

September 6, 2013

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